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November 16, 2008

whack-job or wack-job: which is it?

2fhghyf

The phrase appears increasingly often these days, sometimes with and sometimes without the "h."

If you put "whack-job" into Google, some 367,000 results are said to be out there.

Ouoiu

If you put "wack-job" in, about 124,000 results are returned.

Pretty convincing case for the "h," what?

Yiyti

I'll address the hyphen issue another day.

November 16, 2008 at 02:01 PM | Permalink


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Comments

DEFINITELY "wack-job."
Unless you're arranging a hit, then it's a "whack-job."

Posted by: Joe | Sep 23, 2009 10:01:36 AM

I don't see where the problem lies. The woman is both. Obviously wacko and obviously whacked in the head.

Posted by: Miles | Nov 17, 2008 12:46:40 PM

"This one seems very simple to me. A 'wacko' is a loony. To 'whack' is to hit someone. The word in question means a crazy person, not someone who hits other people. Therefore it is 'WACK-JOB.'"

That does make sense.

However, I could also see it being 'whack-job' as well, in that the person is acting like they've been whacked on the head and is thus 'loony'. Bugs bunny cartoons are most certainly biasing me towards that alternative...

Posted by: johnjohn | Nov 16, 2008 10:14:52 PM

Stigma-creating or prejudice-creating, which is it?

Posted by: Alison Hymes | Nov 16, 2008 4:23:11 PM

This one seems very simple to me. A "wacko" is a loony. To "whack" is to hit someone. The word in question means a crazy person, not someone who hits other people. Therefore it is "WACK-JOB."

Posted by: Lilorfnannie | Nov 16, 2008 2:16:04 PM

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