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January 10, 2009

Freaky Face Paint

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[via Media-Post.net and Nick Wood]

January 10, 2009 at 04:01 PM | Permalink | Comments (3) | TrackBack

Bamboo Tongs

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I like that you can use these with one hand or remove them from the base to wield them separately.

"Silicone base is dishwasher-safe."

Kind of cool looking in situ even if you never pick them up.

Tell people they're sculpture, no one will be know for sure they're not.

And so maybe they are.

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$16.99.

January 10, 2009 at 03:01 PM | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack

A suggestion for those who'd like a response

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Give me an email address.

Every day comments and emails arrive with a question or request only to have either no return email address or some nonexistent proxy like none@none.com.

It's difficult to respond to you when you play hard to get.

I'm just saying.

January 10, 2009 at 02:01 PM | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

SpaceSleeper — World's first wearable pillow

Ss10

Finally.

From the website:

    SpaceSleeper™ Pillow

    Doctor-recommended Spacesleeper Pillow is the first pillow you wear around your head, leaving a protective space between your face and the sleeping surface while comfortably supporting your head and neck.

    There's no painful pressure on your jaw or face, making it perfect for anyone suffering with TMJ or recovering from facial or Lasik surgery.

    It even helps prevent wrinkles and relieves sleep apnea and snoring.

    Ideal for anyone using an oxygen tube.

    Weighs just 11.13 oz.

    Foam/satin/fleece.

    Washable.

...................

Think outside the bed space: there's no good reason I can see why you shouldn't leave it on 24/7 in case a nap suddenly breaks out.

$49.

January 10, 2009 at 01:01 PM | Permalink | Comments (2) | TrackBack

BehindTheMedspeak: Golf can be hazardous to your hearing

Fig1

Long story short: A paper in the December 17, 2008 issue of the British Medical Journal investigated possible hazards of modern drivers and concluded that "... thin faced titanium drivers may produce sufficient sound to induce temporary, or even permanent, cochlear damage, in susceptible individuals. The study presents anecdotal evidence that caution should be exercised by golfers who play regularly with thin faced titanium drivers to avoid damage to their hearing."

The article follows.

    Is golf bad for your hearing?

    A 55 year old right handed man presented to the ear, nose, and throat outpatient clinic with tinnitus and reduced hearing in his right ear. Clinical examination was unremarkable. His pure tone audiogram showed an asymmetrical sensorineural hearing loss, worse on the right, with a decrease on that side at 4-6 kHz (fig 1 — top) typical of a noise induced hearing loss.1 He had been playing golf with a King Cobra LD titanium club three times a week for 18 months and commented that the noise of the club hitting the ball was "like a gun going off." It had become so unpleasant that he had been forced to discard the club.

    Magnetic resonance imaging of his internal acoustic meati showed no abnormality, and we deduced that his asymmetrical sensorineural hearing loss was attributable to the noise of the golf club. Other than regular golf, he had no history of prolonged occupational or recreational exposure to loud noises (such as shooting) or exposure to ototoxic substances to account for this noise induced loss.

    Our internet search of reviews for the King Cobra LD club found some interesting comments:

    "Drives my mates crazy with that distinctive loud ‘BANG’ sound. Have never heard another club that makes so distinctive a sound. It can be heard all over the course, it is mad!!"

    "A very forgiving club . . . albeit the ‘unusual’ clanking sound."

    "I don’t mind the loud BANG as it sounds like the ball goes a really long way. It sounds like an aluminium baseball bat, so some may not like it."

    "This is not so much a ting but a sonic boom which resonates across the course!"


    Diagnosis of noise damage

    Guidelines exist to help diagnose noise induced hearing loss, setting out three requirements and four modifying factors that must be considered to formulate a firm diagnosis. Our patient’s audiogram met the requirements for a high frequency hearing impairment. His hearing was at least 10 dB worse at 4-6 kHz than at 1-2 kHz, and there was a downward notch of at least 20 dB in the 3-6 kHz range (fig 1 — top). The remaining requirement—continuous noise exposure of 100 dB (or 90 dB for susceptible individuals)—does not apply in this case as we are dealing with impact (50 µs) noise. The modifying factors were also consistent with noise induced impairment.

    He had no previous history of noise exposure, and the tinnitus described was a characteristic of noise exposure. In addition, calculation of Robinson-Sutton’s equations confirmed that in a man of 55 years, age induced hearing loss (presbyacusis) could not account for the loss at 4-6 kHz in his right ear, and that it must have been due to noise exposure.


    Noisy clubs

    The coefficient of restitution (COR) of a golf club is a measure of the elasticity or efficiency of energy transfer between a golf ball and club head. The United States Golf Association, in conjunction with the Royal and Ancient, St Andrews, Scotland, stipulates that the upper limit of COR for a golf club in competition use is 0.83.3 This means that a club head striking a ball at 100 miles per hour (mph) will cause the ball to travel at 83 mph. Thinner faced titanium clubs, such as the King Cobra LD, have a greater COR and deform on impact more easily, the so called trampoline effect, not only propelling the ball further, but resulting in a louder noise. The King Cobra LD and Nike SQ both have CORs above 0.83, making them non-conforming for competitions.

    The experience of our patient prompted us to study the sound levels produced by different golf drivers. A professional golfer hit three two-piece golf balls with six thin faced titanium golf drivers and six standard thicker faced stainless steel golf drivers. We used a modular precision sound level meter (Brüel and Kjær) to record the levels of sound impulse (dB). The distance from the right ear of the golfer to the point of impact between the golf club and ball was 1.7 m. We therefore positioned the sound meter 1.7 m from the point of impact.

    The thin faced titanium clubs all produced greater sound levels than the stainless steel clubs (fig 2 — below).

    Fig2_3

    Interestingly, the club used by our patient (King Cobra LD) was not the loudest. Our results show that thin faced titanium drivers may produce sufficient sound to induce temporary, or even permanent, cochlear damage, in susceptible individuals. The study presents anecdotal evidence that caution should be exercised by golfers who play regularly with thin faced titanium drivers to avoid damage to their hearing.

January 10, 2009 at 12:01 PM | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

What is it?

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Answer here this

2red

time tomorrow.

January 10, 2009 at 11:01 AM | Permalink | Comments (3) | TrackBack

Size matters. Or does it? — Episode 2: The envelope please...

You may or may not recall that last Saturday, January 3, 2009, I asked for your thoughts on what size the YouTube videos now featured here on a more or less daily basis should be.

Five official votes came in and the voting has been declared over by my crack poll observation team.

After several days and long nights tabulating the ballots and then rechecking them not once but three times, we finally have the official certified results, which are:

4 votes for the largest size (640 pixels wide — top) and 1 vote for medium (480 wide).

There was one hanging chad equivalent, i.e., an email directly to me that didn't come in via the comments ballot box and was still counted since at the level of audience participation evident, every person's voice matters, even if it is a bit hoarse and strained.

That vote was for the smallest size (320 wide).

I hereby declare from this moment forward that unless there's a reason not to use the largest size, that's what I'll be going with for the indefinite future.

Wait a minute, joe: aren't all futures indefinite?

Good point.

Let me rephrase that: I hereby declare from this moment forward that unless there's a reason not to use the largest size, that's what I'll be going with for the definite future.

Can we move on now?

Thank you.

An excellent suggestion was made by one of the voters, namely to include "... an actual link address. Fun to look at related vids."

Done.

January 10, 2009 at 10:01 AM | Permalink | Comments (5) | TrackBack

Cell Phone Pocket Flask — Episode 2: Price break — and now accessorized

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A reader browsing my archives found this November 24, 2004 post and then, to her chagrin, was unable to purchase the item featured because the link to the site offering it had gone dead in the interim 4+ years.

No problema: here it is once again, this time for $21.95 — 12% less than Episode 1's $24.95.

Tyutuyttf_2

"Holds 3 oz.; stainless steel; 5" tall, 2" wide, 7/8" deep; comes with leather case with spring latch on back."

But wait, there's more: "Small funnel included."

How do you spell "lagniappe?"

January 10, 2009 at 09:01 AM | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack

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