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September 29, 2017

How to eat Pringles

Pringles_Tongue

By far the most useful post so far this year.

It's not even close.

My Crack Georgia Correspondent©®'s thinking "what took so long?"

Never mind.

Below, word from Krista Thurrott.

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While they aren't the most versatile snack food — shout out to the many ways you can eat Oreos — over the years people have gotten creative with how they enjoy their Pringles.

A staple snack at family picnics, days at the beach, or after softball practice, the chips are a household food for most North American families.

What if we told you that you've been eating Pringles wrong?

The Pringles company released a statement that is sure to make customers pick up a can and test the brand's instruction on how to most enjoy your chips.

You may have noticed after finishing a can of Pringles that some chips were more seasoned than others.

It turns out that the chips only have flavor on one side, which can greatly impact the "consumer experience."

"When Pringles are stacked in their can, some of the seasoning rubs off onto the next chip, which is why they've always been a little uneven," said a Pringles spokesperson.

If you want to get technical — and want flavor that packs a punch the next time you're snacking — make sure to eat the chips with the convex side facing up.

This means you should flip the chip upside down so the concave side is pressed to your tongue.

While the convex side of the chip may have seasoning, this can be attributed to leftover flavor from other chips — not strategic seasoning by the makers.

Mind. BLOWN.

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But hold on a second.

Look carefully at the chip pictured up top.

You will note that it has both convex and concave curvatures on both sides.

What gives?

My best reading of the geometry of the chip and the inside advice from Pringles above leads me to the conclusion that when they advise eating the chips with the convex side up, they mean the side with the long convex aspect and shorter concave measurement, in other words as pictured up top.

Flautist?

Bueller?

Anyone?

September 29, 2017 at 12:01 PM | Permalink | Comments (3)

Watch humans age from 1 to 100 years old in 2.5 minutes

Wrote Casey Chan on Gizmodo: "Using a Panasonic GH2, Dutch filmmaker Jeroen Wolf captured people ranging from 1 year young to 100 years old. It's simple — the person stares at the camera and states their age — yet incredibly touching to see the growth and experience you earn as the years add up."

"Wolf actually started the project last October by documenting people in Amsterdam but the project petered out because it was difficult to find very young and very old subjects."

Wolf says:

I found my very old 'models' in care homes and it was a privilege to document these — often vulnerable — people for this project. I had particular problems finding a 99 year-old. (Apparently 100 year-olds enjoy notoriety, but a 99 year-old is a rare species...) And when I finally did find one, she refused to state her age. She simply denied being 99 years old! But finally, some 4 months after I recorded my first "age," I was able to capture the "missing link" and conclude this project.

[via PetaPixel]

September 29, 2017 at 10:01 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)

What is it?

Z

Answer here this time tomorrow.

Hint: smaller than a bread box.

Another: no moving parts.

A third: two sizes.

September 29, 2017 at 08:01 AM | Permalink | Comments (1)

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