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January 27, 2006

In search of lost time — 'What blogs cost American business'

Sswwwaaaa

Bradley Johnson's recent article in Advertising Age, "What Blogs Cost American Business," is getting all manner of media play, both online and in print.

The latest issue of The Atlantic magazine, a bloated stack of wasted paper if I do say so myself, has a brief note about Johnson's piece, from the tired old "woe is us, people at work are wasting time" point of view.

Wrote the Atlantic:

    Most of us will admit to wasting some time at work.

    But three new studies suggest that more time is lost now than ever before.

    According to a survey in Advertising Age, a leading culprit is Weblogs.

    The survey indicates that one in four U.S. workers reads blogs regularly while at work, losing, on average, some nine percent of the workweek.

    This amounts to 551,000 years of labor lost in 2005 alone.

********************

I guess it all depends on your point of view — me, all I could see in the above was the enormous upside just waiting for me.

I mean, at least 75% of the U.S. workforce has yet to discover the delights of bookofjoe consumed while on the job.

w00t!

Maybe I'll turn my attention for the time being from the nascent Chinese and Indian spaces to this great untouched American majority.

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I would suggest that time, like love, cannot be wasted.

January 27, 2006 at 04:01 PM | Permalink


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Comments

The cluetrain manifesto makes the point best; get out of the way of your employees, so they can connect with your audience and world. Give them the tools and strategies to connect with the world. It's not wasting time.

Posted by: John Cass | Feb 15, 2006 3:19:31 PM

I've had both BOJ and E&N give me "inappropriate content" messages when I have logged on from work. Now I only read blogs I know won't get me that message. Like mine.

Posted by: riannan | Jan 27, 2006 7:52:14 PM

Maybe it's because I'm paid to be creative, in effect, but I have, honestly, never had any employer, in my 15 years in the workforce, complain about "wasting time" with non-work items, from going for a walk (I keep a pair of walking shoes and comfy socks in my desk and take off all the time) to closing my doors and blasting the radio to taking a coffee break with a co-worker in the breakroom to yes, reading non-work-related blogs on work time.

Some of my best business ideas have come from content I've read on those purported non-work-related blogs though. (And I've spent many a weekend perusing work-related blogs too.)

I think there's a much blurrier line now between "work" and "life" - and if they want to get nit-picky about the "work" line they need to be willing to get nit-picky about the "life" line too!

NOTE: If anyone from work is reading this blog, I never read Joe on work time, of course. I use the Typepad "post comments ahead" feature at home the night before, of course. ;)

Posted by: Shawn Lea | Jan 27, 2006 4:43:23 PM

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