« February 6, 2006 | Main | February 8, 2006 »

February 7, 2006

Mario Testino does Princess Diana — The Last Session

111111hgrth

In March of 1997, just five months before her untimely death on August 31, 1997 at age 36

2fhgergqetrg

under circumstances that remain mysterious to this day,

3fgdarggeg

über–photographer Mario Testino was invited by Princess Diana to

4dffgergwetge

Kensington Palace for a photo shoot some of whose results

5bgfnbn_nb

later appeared in Vanity Fair magazine.

6diana_021

Many others remained unpublished until now,

7qsdwedgfrf

when they make their first public appearance in this 136–page book.

8gbdafggrthg

The look and feel of these photos have an uncanny resemblance to those taken by Bert Stern of Marilyn Monroe and published after her death as "Marilyn Monroe: The Complete Last Sitting."

In that book, made up of over 2,500 shots taken over the course of a three–day sitting six weeks before the actress's death on August 5, 1962 at age 36 under circumstances that remain mysterious to this day, Monroe seems to recapitulate and relive all the roles and selves she portrayed and embodied over the years.

That book, however, is no longer in print and has become a collectible, with one copy currently available at Amazon "still in shrinkwrap" for $275 and others ranging up to $2,000.

9rhbrewybnhy

Diana by Testino — $39.99.

February 7, 2006 at 04:01 PM | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack

21st–Century Spaghetti Plate

Ss1sssvcbnbvn

A bookofjoe exclusive.

Last night I was walking on my treadmill, doing something close to nothing (but fairly different than the night before) when, out of the ether, came an email from Canada, from one Jacques–Paul Rozand.

Attached were photos (above and below) of his sensational "Great Canadian Spaghetti Plate."

He's been quietly following my explorations of the spaghetti twirling space and decided to break his silence with what appears to me to be a quantum leap forward for pasta lovers planet–wide.

His unique dish offers a dedicated, formed pocket for one forkful of noodles to rest in while being twirled into a scrumptious, mouth–watering, perfectly proportioned (sauce/pasta) mouthful.

Ss2gfhhhgv

Features:

• Childproof

• Stainproof

• 11"W x 1"D

• Dishwasher–safe

• Heat–resistant to 284°F (140°C)

• Made of durable, high–impact–resistant Melamine

• Hypo–allergenic

• Made in Italy

• Light–weight

• Stackable

A set of four plates costs $21.80 (USD); shipping and handling add $15 for a total of $36.80 delivered.

Nice price.

If you'd like to be the first on your block to own a set, send a money order or certified check for $36.80 to:

Jacques–Paul Rozand
#5 — 16061 Airport Road
Caledon, Ontario, Canada
L7C1G4

You can email him: spaghetti_plate@sympatico.ca

Ss3cngngghjf

If you'd like to be Jacques–Paul's business partner or invest in his venture and join him in bringing his spaghetti plate to the mass retail market (ka–ching), contact him.

Tell him bookofjoe sent you.

February 7, 2006 at 03:01 PM | Permalink | Comments (4) | TrackBack

Treadmill walking phenomenon spreading fast — American Public Media Radio's Jon Gordon, host of 'Future Tense,' interviews Tom Niccum and Dr. James Levine

118943d

It's viral, folks: this morning, just hours ago, the gospel went forth over the ether.

Radio host Jon Gordon seemed incredulous that Tom was actually walking on his treadmill throughout their live interview.

Well, the proof of the pudding will be in the viewing: Tom (whose treadmill desk is pictured below)

22650320f

just emailed me and said WCCO–TV called and is on its way over to film a live interview for tonight's news.

w00t!

Listen to the Future Tense radio interview here, then get over to Tom's page at squidoo (which, by the way, after only a couple weeks is ranked #2 in the Heath and Medicine section) and see what can be done if you're willing to take a walk on the wild side.

As if.

They say a person's treadmill desk set–up says a lot about that person.

Why does this not make me very happy as I look at the nifty creations of Dr. Levine (top) and Tom and then my messed–up, wigged–out electronic junkyard (below)?

330009

Hey, I know what: I'll have my crack research team redesign my treadmill desk/multimedia set–up from the rug up.

That oughta be good for a wince and a laugh.

February 7, 2006 at 02:01 PM | Permalink | Comments (3) | TrackBack

Giant Spatula — 'We never make pies without it'

1079638468818

Hey, if it's good enough for the superb bakers at BakersCatalogue.com then it's good enough for me.

Full disclosure: I ordered one of their coffeecakes at holiday time last year and it was so delicious I licked the plate it came on after the last scrumptious bite disappeared.

Put it on my (very short) permanent re–order list.

But I digress.

From the website and catalog:

    Moving pie crust has never been so easy!

    This is the ONE pie tool I will not live without.

    If you're like me, and have trouble moving your delicate (read: patched–up) piecrust from counter to plate (or getting underneath to add more flour when rolling), this is the tool you need.

    • Easily moves your delicate pie crust.

    • Features an aluminum blade and acrylic handle.

    • Giant spatula measures 10 x 10 inches.

    • Weighs 8 oz.

$19.95 (put giant spatula in the search box at the upper left, where it says "keyword").

February 7, 2006 at 01:01 PM | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

BehindTheMedspeak: Got Earwax? And if you do, well, is it wet or dry?

Ngbhmhmbhhbvh

Finally I address something important, something that might actually make a difference in how you live your life.

From a team of Japanese researchers led by Kohichiro Yoshiura at Nagasaki University comes sensational news: the gene that controls whether you have wet or dry earwax has, at long last, been identified.

Now admit it: haven't you been losing sleep for years, wondering when they'd finally pin it down?

Me too.

Nicholas Wade of the New York Times reported on the findings, published in the journal Nature Genetics on January 30.

Should you prefer the USA Today take on the discovery, here you go.

Here's the Times story.

    Scientists Find Gene That Controls Type of Earwax in People

    Earwax may not play a prominent part in human history but at least a small role for it has now been found by a team of Japanese researchers.

    Earwax comes in two types, wet and dry.

    The wet form predominates in Africa and Europe, where 97 percent or more of people have it, and the dry form among East Asians.

    The populations of South and Central Asia are roughly half and half.

    By comparing the DNA of Japanese with each type, the researchers were able to identify the gene that controls which type a person has, they report in today's issue of Nature Genetics.

    They then found that the switch of a single DNA unit in the gene determines whether a person has wet or dry earwax.

    The gene's role seems to be to export substances out of the cells that secrete earwax.

    The single DNA change deactivates the gene and, without its contribution, a person has dry earwax.

    The Japanese researchers, led by Kohichiro Yoshiura of Nagasaki University, then studied the gene in 33 ethnic groups around the world.

    Since the wet form is so common in Africa and in Europe, this was likely to have been the ancestral form before modern humans left Africa 50,000 years ago.

    The dry form, the researchers say, presumably arose later in northern Asia, because they detected it almost universally in their tests of northern Han Chinese and Koreans.

    The dry form becomes less common in southern Asia, probably because the northerners with the dry earwax gene intermarried with southern Asians carrying the default wet earwax gene.

    The dry form is quite common in Native Americans, confirming other genetic evidence that their ancestors migrated across the Bering Strait from Siberia 15,000 years ago.

    The Japanese team says that the gene that affects earwax, known to geneticists as the ATP-binding cassette C11 gene, lies with three other genes in a long stretch of DNA that has very little variation from one person to another.

    Lack of variation in a sequence of DNA units is often the signature of a new gene so important for survival that it has swept through the population, erasing all the previous variation that had accumulated in the course of evolution.

    But earwax seems to have the very humble role of being no more than biological flypaper, preventing dust and insects from entering the ear.

    Since it seems unlikely that having wet or dry earwax could have made much difference to an individual's fitness, the earwax gene may have some other, more important function.

    Dr. Yoshiura and his colleagues suggest that the gene would have been favored because of its role in sweating.

    They write that earwax type and armpit odor are correlated, since populations with dry earwax, such as those of East Asia, tend to sweat less and have little or no body odor, while the wet earwax populations of Africa and Europe sweat more and so may have more body odor.

    Several Asian features, like small nostrils, are conjectured to be adaptations to the cold.

    Less sweating, the Japanese authors suggest, may be another adaptation to the cold in which the ancestors of East Asian peoples are thought to have lived.

********************

But now you're just getting warmed up, isn't that right?

I know you so well.

But I digress.

Here's a link to the abstract of the Nature Genetics paper.

And now I'm really gonna put a bee in your bonnet.

Because tomorrow, at 12:01 p.m., precisely 24 hours from now, bookofjoe is going to run an unprecedented (if it happened before I sure as heck can't remember it and my crack research team is, as usual, asleep at the switch so there's no help from that peanut gallery) Episode 2 of "BehindTheMedspeak: Got Earwax?," featuring a revolutionary new tool to enable 21st–century earwax management — in the privacy of your own home.

Don't miss it.

February 7, 2006 at 12:01 PM | Permalink | Comments (3) | TrackBack

Magic Date Ball Pocket Slider Watermelon Lollipop

1pict0001_1

Pictured above, it's a triumph of design and function.

In a pocket–sized package (it measures 4.75" high and the barrel is 7/8" in diameter) Mattel and 7-11 (where I purchased it yesterday for a couple dollars, up near the cash register with all the St. Valentine's Day stuff) have delivered one wonderful toy and candy delight.

1) At the top is a working mini Magic Date Ball, with the little window and the dark inky blue liquid inside and the small white thingie with all the triangular faces that say stuff like "maybe," "count on it," "sure," — you know the drill by now.

3pict0003

2) There's a button on the side: you remove the Magic Date Ball, follow the instructions on the label to "slide lollipop up" and a cylindrical watermelon–flavored lollipop rises from the device's body for you to marvel at and enjoy.

3) When you've had your fill you slide it back down and reattach the Magic Date Ball.

Bonus: "For ages 4 and up."

2pict0002_1

Finally — something we can all enjoy.

February 7, 2006 at 11:01 AM | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack

I Vote for Shawn

Cold

Shawn Lea (above) styles herself an "official bookofjoe crackpot research team member" but she is far too modest.

The cream always rises to the top and so has she, to reign supreme above my mötley crüe of wanna–be's masquerading as crack research team members.

You want proof?

OK, how about the following boilerplate which she singlehandedly has concocted out of whole cloth and which is appended to all of her responses to requests for help from bookofjoe?

********************

VOTE FOR SHAWN: If you feel this e-mail has helped you in some small way, please help me win the coveted bookofjoe Crackpot Researcher of the Month title. Just forward this e-mail to Joe at jas1@uclalumni.net with "I Vote for Shawn" as the title.

NOTE: This e-mail may be monitored for quality assurance or training purposes. We always strive to provide the highest level of customer service but should you be dissatisfied with our response, feel free to e-mail jas1@uclalumni.net with any complaints. If you wish to lodge a complaint, please reference Crackpot Research Team Member #007.

DISCLAIMER: All information contained herein is freely searchable in the public domain and may be freely distributed and copied. All persons reproducing, redistributing, or making commercial use of this information are expected to adhere to the terms and conditions asserted by the copyright holder, if there is one. Dr. Joseph A. Stirt (dba bookofjoe, ltd.) does not warrant or assume any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed. The views and opinions of official bookofjoe crackpot research team members do not necessarily state or reflect those of Dr. Stirt.

TERMS AND CONDITIONS: CRACKPOT RESEARCHERS EXPRESSLY DISCLAIM ALL WARRANTIES OF ANY KIND, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING WITHOUT LIMITATION ANY WARRANTY OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE OR NON-INFRINGEMENT. NEITHER BOOKOFJOE.COM NOR ANY OF ITS CRACKPOT RESEARCHERS, PARENTS, MEMBERS, SUBSIDIARIES, AFFILIATES, SERVICE PROVIDERS, LICENSORS, OFFICERS, DIRECTORS OR EMPLOYEES SHALL BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES ARISING OUT OF OR RELATING TO THIS E-MAIL OR RESULTING FROM THE USE OR THE INABILITY TO USE THE GIVEN INFORMATION, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO DAMAGES FOR LOSS OF PROFITS, USE, DATA OR OTHER INTANGIBLE DAMAGES.

ATTENTION! This Email may contain PRIVILEGED and CONFIDENTIAL material and its transmission is not a waiver of that privilege. It is intended for the sole use of the individual or entity named above. If you are not the intended recipient, please be notified that any use, disclosure, review, distribution or copying of this email is strictly prohibited. If you have received this email by error, please delete it and notify the sender immediately. Thank you.

February 7, 2006 at 10:01 AM | Permalink | Comments (2) | TrackBack

Tiffany Sterling Silver Harmonica

Tttfffff

10 holes and 20 reeds.

Made by Hohner.

In the Key of C.

$225.

February 7, 2006 at 09:01 AM | Permalink | Comments (6) | TrackBack

« February 6, 2006 | Main | February 8, 2006 »