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February 21, 2006

File under 'Now they tell us'

Wsj_a00120060221

From today's Wall Street Journal "Corrections and Amplifications":

    Procter & Gamble Co.'s product Rejoice is a shampoo.

    Friday's Advertising column about ad spending in China incorrectly referred to Rejoice as a toothpaste.

********************

Once again it needs to be pointed out that there is nothing too trivial to interest me; nor is there anything I avoid because it's simply too much.

In the end, the two seeming opposites are the very same thing.

Of course, as John Maynard Keynes so wisely observed, "In the long run we are all dead," so I suppose I'm not exactly breaking new ground here.

********************

Those looking for a guide to blog writing style could do worse than get in the habit of reading the "Corrections" features of the major daily newspapers.

The editors responsible for this clean–up duty pride themselves on using the absolute minimum number of words necessary to set the record straight with perfect clarity.

Just an idle thought.

I'm full of those.

Why are we not surprised?

Now, back to our regularly scheduled ridiculousness, as Martha might say.

February 21, 2006 at 03:01 PM | Permalink


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Comments

But what's with the "and amplifications"? They aren't adding any extra details unless they misspoke the first time...so how is that an amplification too? It's just a correction.

(I know, I know. Many others use this too. It just bugs me every time I read it.)

Posted by: Shawn Lea | Feb 21, 2006 3:31:26 PM

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