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October 6, 2006

Helpful hints from joeeze — Experts' Expert: How to tell if you have a water leak

Sarah Tilton interviewed Ed Del Grande, a plumber with over 25 years of experience, for the "Tricks of the Trade" feature that appeared in the October 4, 2006 Wall Street Journal.

Here's what he said to do:

1) Turn off everything in your house that uses water.

2) Find your water meter.

3) Look at the wheels that measure and display water use.

4) If the wheels are moving, you've got a leak somewhere in your house.

5) "The most common culprits: toilets."

No charge for this house call.

October 6, 2006 at 04:01 PM | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack

Woolen Wood Rug

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From (who else?)

15ry6

Floor To Heaven.

October 6, 2006 at 03:01 PM | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Propeller Clock

A project by Luis F. Ferraz and Miguel H. Teruel.

"Utilizando um uC PIC e um reed switch como sensor de posicao/rotacao."

That's what it says here, where I found it.

October 6, 2006 at 02:01 PM | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack

Edgy — From Dior

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That's my name for them.

They appeared on the bottom third of page four of this past Sunday's New York Times Styles section, so Dior must think highly of them as well.

Zippers up alongside the heels and part of a snap closure on the outside, its mate up front securing the buckle.

Nothing works but everything connects, in its own stylish, metaphorical way.

October 6, 2006 at 01:01 PM | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack

Tie One On — World's only website devoted exclusively to aprons — and the people who love them

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Created by Amy Karol of Portland, Oregon.

A new apron project every month.

October 6, 2006 at 12:01 PM | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack

Collapsible Ironing Board — Surf's Up!

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You know the song

    it goes like this:

    A-well-a everybody's heard about the bird
    B-b-b-bird, bird, bird, b-bird's the word
    A-well-a bird, bird, bird, the bird is the word
    A-well-a bird, bird, bird, well the bird is the word
    A-well-a bird, bird, bird, b-bird's the word
    A-well-a bird, bird, bird, well the bird is the word
    A-well-a bird, bird, b-bird's the word
    A-well-a bird, bird, bird, b-bird's the word
    A-well-a bird, bird, bird, well the bird is the word
    A-well-a bird, bird, b-bird's the word
    A-well-a don't you know about the bird?
    Well, everybody knows that the bird is the word!
    A-well-a bird, bird, b-bird's the word
    A-well-a...

    A-well-a everybody's heard about the bird
    Bird, bird, bird, b-bird's the word
    A-well-a bird, bird, bird, b-bird's the word
    A-well-a bird, bird, bird, b-bird's the word
    A-well-a bird, bird, b-bird's the word
    A-well-a bird, bird, bird, b-bird's the word
    A-well-a bird, bird, bird, b-bird's the word
    A-well-a bird, bird, bird, b-bird's the word
    A-well-a bird, bird, bird, b-bird's the word
    A-well-a don't you know about the bird?
    Well, everybody's talking about the bird!
    A-well-a bird, bird, b-bird's the word
    A-well-a bird...

    Surfin' bird
    Bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbb... [retching noises]... aaah!

    Pa-pa-pa-pa-pa-pa-pa-pa-pa-pa-pa-pa-pa-pa-pa-pa-
    Pa-pa-pa-pa-pa-pa-pa-pa-pa-pa-pa-pa-pa-pa-ooma-mow-mow
    Papa-ooma-mow-mow

    Papa-ooma-mow-mow, papa-ooma-mow-mow
    Papa-ooma-mow-mow, papa-ooma-mow-mow
    Ooma-mow-mow, papa-ooma-mow-mow
    Papa-ooma-mow-mow, papa-ooma-mow-mow
    Papa-ooma-mow-mow, papa-ooma-mow-mow
    Oom-oom-oom-oom-ooma-mow-mow
    Papa-ooma-mow-mow, papa-oom-oom-oom
    Oom-ooma-mow-mow, papa-ooma-mow-mow
    Ooma-mow-mow, papa-ooma-mow-mow
    Papa-a-mow-mow, papa-ooma-mow-mow
    Papa-ooma-mow-mow, ooma-mow-mow
    Papa-ooma-mow-mow, ooma-mow-mow
    Papa-oom-oom-oom-oom-ooma-mow-mow
    Oom-oom-oom-oom-ooma-mow-mow
    Ooma-mow-mow, papa-ooma-mow-mow
    Papa-ooma-mow-mow, ooma-mow-mow
    Well don't you know about the bird?
    Well, everybody knows that the bird is the word!
    A-well-a bird, bird, b-bird's the word

    Papa-ooma-mow-mow, papa-ooma-mow-mow
    [repeat until brain-dead]

Wait a minute — I was there before I started singing....

But I digress.

From the (ironing board) website:

    Tabletop Ironing Board

    Folds easily For compact storage

    This space-saving ironing board sits at the perfect height for ironing, and its stable, collapsible legs fold easily for storage.

    Pullout stand holds a hot iron so you don't damage the surface you're working on.

    12" x 35"L.

....................

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$39.95.

October 6, 2006 at 11:01 AM | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack

Perry's Deli in Chicago, Illinois is my kind of place

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Why?

Wrote Alexia Elajalde-Ruiz in a story in the October 3 Chicago Tribune, "If you make or receive a call at the bustling downtown sandwich shop, you trip a sensor that triggers an excruciating wail akin to a firehouse siren. Before you can hit 'End,' all eyes are on you, violator of Perry's cardinal rule: 'If you are that important that you must use your phone, you should be eating at a much more upscale restaurant.'"

As one who abhors self-importance, I'm loving it.

If your cellphone goes off while you're reading bookofjoe, you should be viewing a much more upscale website.

Wait a minute....

Here's the article.

    Talk at your own risk at these local spots

    You do not want your cell phone going off at Perry's Deli.

    If you make or receive a call at the bustling downtown sandwich shop, you trip a sensor that triggers an excruciating wail akin to a firehouse siren. Before you can hit "End," all eyes are on you, violator of Perry's cardinal rule: "If you are that important that you must use your phone, you should be eating at a much more upscale restaurant."

    Perry's cell-phone ban, born during a busy lunch rush in 1996 when customers were so busy gabbing on their cell phones they couldn't order, was a pioneer in the backlash against cell phones.

    "If people are on their cell phones, they're not participating in our community," Perry's manager Earnest Ford said.

    Increasingly, other businesses are catching on — though with subtler methods.

    At downtown restaurant Bandera, which bans cell phones in the dining room, waiters will "graciously" drop a "nicely printed" note on a user's table informing them of the policy, general manager Tracy Smith said.

    Such restrictions, Smith said, are becoming "more common than not" in the restaurant industry.

    A more informal cell-phone ban has taken root at Pelly's Liquors in Lakeview, where a handwritten note taped to the door alerts customers they can't shop and talk. Owner Dianna Fourkas said she instituted the ban this summer because people take longer to shop when they're roaming around the store chatting on their phones, disrupting her job because she's forced to stay and baby-sit them.

    Cell-phone restrictions also are popping up in the workplace because the noise disrupts co-workers and can interfere with productivity. About 40 percent of organizations surveyed by the Society for Human Resource Management had a written cell-phone policy in place in 2004.

    Some banks have banned cell phones for security reasons, and camera phones are unwelcome at some gyms to protect people's privacy. Camera phones — used by about 40 percent of cell-phone subscribers, according to Telephia — also are a concern at some companies that worry employees might use them to disseminate embarrassing photos of colleagues or to leak confidential documents and trade secrets.

    "There's no question that some companies are worried about the risks associated with leaks, especially with the electronic capability today," said John Challenger, CEO of the Chicago outplacement consulting firm Challenger, Gray and Christmas. "But companies can't afford to ban cell phones. The world works on cell phones."

October 6, 2006 at 10:01 AM | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Stone Cheese Board

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Fooled you.

Fooled me too.

'Course, that's not saying a whole lot.

But I digress.

From the website:

    Stone Cheese Board

    It's not Swiss, it's Mexican alabaster!

    This gorgeous stone lends its luminous color to a clever take on the traditional cheese board.

    The serving piece’s generous size allows you to present guests with an array of cheeses, while the stainless steel cheese knife makes serving simple.

    A witty addition to your party hosting arsenal, this cheese serving set is also a great gift for all fromage fans amongst your friends.

    Board: 10"L x 10"W x 1.5"D; knife: 8.5"L.

....................

File under "Things are seldom what they seem...."

$100 (cheese and crackers not included).

October 6, 2006 at 09:01 AM | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

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