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March 31, 2007

Houseblogs.net — 'A Virtual Neighborhood for Home Improvement Blogs'

518

Currently there are 1,511

771

members from countries all

25

over the world and 612 blogs

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about things home-related.

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See how the other 99% lives.

March 31, 2007 at 04:01 PM | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack

Giant Tweezers

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A blast from the past.

I get enough email asking where to buy these 10"-long puppies that I thought I'd preempt the next few weeks' incoming with this post.

"Retrieve items in jars, disposals or drains" reads the website but that's just scratching the surface of what's possible once you've got yours.

$7.95.

March 31, 2007 at 03:01 PM | Permalink | Comments (2) | TrackBack

The Great Sardine Taste-Off

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It appeared on Chowhound.com on January 15, 2006 and generated an enormously favorable series of comments and responses, among them "Ahh, yes. THIS is the Chowhound post I've been waiting for."

It deserves every accolade rendered, as it's superb.

Me, I happened to read Rowley Leigh's appreciation of sardines in today's Financial Times and got a hankering for some, so before heading out to Whole Foods and Foods of All Nations I had my crack research team do a little due diligence.

Do the due — I like it.

Anyway, the team happened on the Chowhound post in a Google search of "best sardines?", where it appears on the second page of results, number 7 of 1,120,000.

That's a lot of sardines.

Wait a minute....

The same Chowhound reviewer produced an encore post on the same subject, which appeared on March 22, 2006 and resulted in another outpouring of passionate reader responses.

The Chowhound reviewer, rworange, listed the results in the first post (below) from Best to "Wouldn't buy again," which group started with #14, Mega sardines.

1. Angelo Parodi Sardine Portoghesi all’olio di olivo – Portugal/Italy - $1.99
2. Albo Sardines in Olive oil – Spain - $4.99
3. King Oscar Sardines Mediterranean style – Norway, packed in Poland - $2.99
4. Yankee Clipper lightly smoked sardines in soybean oil – Morocco - $2.49
5. King Oscar Extra Small Sardines in fish oil 2 layers – Norway - $2.99
6. Beach Cliff Sardines in soybean oil – USA / Canada - $.69
7. Brunswick Sardines in Spring Water No Salt Added – Canada - $1.19
8. Madrigal spiced sardines in vegetable oil – Morocco - $1.59
9. Brunswick Sardines in Olive Oil – Canada - $1.19
10. King Oscar Extra Small Brisling Sardines in purest virgin olive oil – Norway - $2.99
11. King Oscar tiny tots Sardines in olive oil two layers – Norway - $2.99
12. Palacio Real Small Sardines in Olive oil (slightly smoked) – Spain - $2.99
13. King Oscar Sardines in pure spring water – Norway - $2.99
14. Mega Sardines in tomato sauce with chili – The Philippines - $.79
15. Brunswick Sardines in Mustard Sauce – Canada - $1.19
16. Bumble Bee Sardines in Mustard – Poland - $.89
17. Yankee Clipper lightly smoked sardines in tomato sauce – Morocco - $2.49
18. Yankee Clipper lightly smoked sardines in mustard sauce – Morocco - $2.49
19. King Oscar Sardines in tomato – Norway - $2.99
20. Brunswick Sardines in Mustard and Dill Sauce – Canada - $1.19
21. King Oscar Skinless & boneless Sardines in olive oil – Morocco - $2.99
22. Gourmet Award lightly smoked sardines in tomato sauce – Morocco - $1.89
23. Brunswick Sardines in tomato & basil Sauce – Canada - $1.19

In the second (March 22, 2006) post an additional 7 brands/types were incorporated into an updated list of 30, which follows.

Note that Mega, leading those not recommended, is #21 here.

1. Angelo Parodi Sardine Portoghesi all’olio di olivo – Portugal/Italy - $1.99
2. Gallego sardines in olive oil - Spain - $2. 99
3. Idamar Portuguese Sardines in olive oil - Portugal - $2. 25
4. Gonsalves Sardines in olive oil –Portugal - $1.99
5. Da Morgada Sardines in Pure Olive Oil - Portugal - $3. 99
6. Albo Sardines in Olive oil – Spain - $4.99
7. King Oscar Sardines Mediterranean style – Norway, packed in Poland - $2.99
8. Yankee Clipper lightly smoked sardines in soybean oil – Morocco - $2.49
9. King Oscar Extra Small Sardines in fish oil 2 layers – Norway - $2.99
10. Brand: BELA-Olhão lightly smoked sardines in cayenne pepper-flavored extra virgin olive oil. - Portugal - $1. 75
11. Beach Cliff Sardines in soybean oil –USA / Canada - $.69
12. Brunswick Sardines in Spring Water No Salt Added – Canada - $1.19
13. Madrigal spiced sardines in vegetable oil – Morocco - $1.59
14. Brunswick Sardines in Olive Oil –Canada - $1.19
15. King Oscar Extra Small Brisling Sardines in purest virgin olive oil – Norway - $2.99
16. King Oscar tiny tots Sardines in olive oil two layers – Norway - $2.99
17. Crown Prince One Layer Sardines in soy bean oil no Salt - Scotland - $1. 85
18. Palacio Real Small Sardines in Olive oil (slightly smoked) – Spain - $2.99
19. King Oscar Sardines in pure spring water – Norway - $2.99
20. BUMBLE BEE Sardines in Water – Poland - $.89
21. Mega Sardines in tomato sauce with chili – The Philippines - $.79
22. Brunswick Sardines in Mustard Sauce – Canada - $1.19
23. Bumble Bee Sardines in Mustard –Poland - $.89
24. Yankee Clipper lightly smoked sardines in tomato sauce –Morocco - $2.49
25. Yankee Clipper lightly smoked sardines in mustard sauce –Morocco - $2.49
26. King Oscar Sardines in tomato –Norway - $2.99
27. Brunswick Sardines in Mustard and Dill Sauce –Canada - $1.19
28. King Oscar Skinless & boneless Sardines in olive oil –Morocco - $2.99
29. Gourmet Award lightly smoked sardines in tomato sauce –Morocco - $1.89
30. Brunswick Sardines in tomato & basil Sauce – Canada - $1.19

And with that, I'm outa here.

March 31, 2007 at 02:01 PM | Permalink | Comments (6) | TrackBack

No-Crease Pants Hanger Pads

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From the website:

    No-Crease Pads — Keep Your Pants Crease Free!

    With No-Crease Pads you'll never have to iron twice!

    Protective covers prevent slacks from creasing and slipping off the hanger onto the floor where they would wrinkle.

    Foam pads attach easily to any size coat hanger.

....................

Twelve for $12.95.

But joe — you only have four pairs of pants — whatcha gonna do with the other eight pads?

As Jack Benny said on his radio show back in the day, in response to a robber sticking a gun in his ribs and saying, "Your money or your life, which is it gonna be?" — "I'm thinking, I'm thinking...."

March 31, 2007 at 01:01 PM | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Is your beachfront property going to be underwater in 50 years?

Now comes ClimateAppraisal.com, a venture of three University of Arizona scientists, to give you the answer.

"For $30 and a few computer clicks... users get assessments of 50 factors, including sea-level rise, temperature, drought, flood, wildfire and others risks expected to worsen with warming temperatures," wrote Patrick O'Driscoll in a March 29, 2007 USA Today story, which follows.

    Website checks your home's climate change risk

    Three University of Arizona scientists won approval from the board of regents this month to create Climate Appraisal Services with an East Coast entrepreneur. They call it the first online, address-based tool for gauging climate-change hazards in the next 50-100 years. It also lists natural and man-made dangers, from hurricanes and earthquakes to pollution and disease.

    The service taps the scientists' own climate research, numerous public databases and studies, and data from about a dozen government agencies.

    Company CEO David Purcell hatched the idea after wondering what sea-level rise might do to coastal property he was seeking for a home. "That had troubled me, the aspects of climate change and what that meant with shoreline reduction," says Purcell of Easton, Conn. He says he and his wife have held off on buying near the water "because it's high-risk" for the future.

    Climate models estimate global warming could raise sea levels from a few inches to 3 feet or more by century's end. Purcell's group notes that uncertainty but emphasizes that hurricane intensity and surge, worsened by warming, raises the risk along the shore. That issue alone "could realign real estate values on coasts in this century in a major way," Purcell says.

    The company intends to put 50% of profits back into peer-reviewed climate research, including grants to other scientists and programs. For $30 and a few computer clicks (climateappraisal.com), users get assessments of 50 factors, including sea-level rise, temperature, drought, flood, wildfire and other risks expected to worsen with warming temperatures. Environmental risks include weather, disease, pollution and industrial factors, such as Lyme disease, West Nile virus, power plants, acid rain and county radon levels.

    Private and government insurers already factor some of that data into home, commercial and flood policies.

    Patrick Michaels, a senior environmental fellow at the Cato Institute, doubts the appraisals' worth because computer climate models differ widely on precipitation and other factors. "But you know what," he adds, "I would encourage people to buy (an appraisal), hand it to their children to put in a safe place and 50 years from now see if it's right or not."

    Jonathan Overpeck, lead science adviser for the company and head of Arizona's Institute for the Study of Planet Earth, says it uses only models that hit "closer to the mark." He says the service's chief appeal is "one-stop shopping" for everyday people.

    "This report opened our eyes to a lot of things we never would have thought about," says Pam Moody, 54, of Williamsburg, Va., who ran a climate appraisal before buying there with her husband, Howard. "Being on a peninsula between the York and James rivers and the Chesapeake Bay, we wondered about sea level and stuff like that. Most of it is things you would really have to dig for and do a lot of research on."

March 31, 2007 at 12:01 PM | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

iTurbo

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From the website:

    iTurbo®

    Charge your iPod anywhere in the world.

    This charger is perfect for the traveler or for use during power outages and other emergencies.

    Lightweight and ultra-compact, it charges any iPod (except the Shuffle) in about an hour without the need for a laptop.

    • Size of a lipstick — easy to pack and convenient to use

    • Guaranteed not to overcharge or damage your iPod

    • Great for power outages and other emergencies

    • Includes a removable USB charging tip

    • Lightweight, portable and reusable

    • Requires 1 AA battery (included)

    • Weight: 4.5 oz

    • Aluminum

    • 3" x 5/8"

$24.95.

March 31, 2007 at 11:01 AM | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack

Emphasize your strengths, ignore your weaknesses — a strategy for success?

Hbjlijlij

I've long subscribed to the philosophy of putting all your wood behind your sharpest arrow.

In his March 28, 2007 Wall Street Journal review of Marcus Buckingham's new book, "Go Put Your Strengths To Work," reviewer Kenneth Roman (former chairman and CEO of Ogilvy & Mather Worldwide) mentioned that in conjunction with the book's publication, a website called simplystrengths.com offers a "Strengths Engagement Track" test to see just how much you could profit from the book.

At this point, there's good news and bad news.

The good news is that the test is free.

The bad news is that to take the free test you have to have a 10-digit ID code.

The good news about the bad news is that this code is printed inside the flap of every copy of Buckingham's book.

The bad news about this good news is that you therefore have to go to a bricks-and-mortar bookstore, find a copy, copy down the code (Kenneth, you'll want to also make note of the frequency... but I digress), then return to the peace and quiet of your computer and proceed.

Hardly seems worth the trouble, what?

But maybe that's just me.

And don't worry, your score won't go on your permanent record – wherever and whatever that is.

Want more?

Here's a link to a video interview with Buckingham.

Here's a link to one of his lectures.

I must say, for a guy who's supposed to be pretty smart Buckingham sure doesn't have a clue about how to leverage the internet to his book's — and his — advantage.

He should be making it simple and transparent to take his test instead of requiring all this secret ID code rigamarole.

Wake up and smell the caramels, Marcus.

March 31, 2007 at 10:01 AM | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

What is it?

2hlllhlkk

Answer here this time tomorrow.

March 31, 2007 at 09:01 AM | Permalink | Comments (3) | TrackBack

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