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October 26, 2007

IKEPOD Horizon Watch

1ewtreut

Designed by Marc Newson, it refers "... to the 'event horizon' in astrophysics, literally meaning the edge of a black hole — the moment when gravity becomes infinite, when both time and space disappear."

Looked at that way, death is a black hole.

But I digress.

I've always liked Newson's perspective on things and this only reinforces that affinity.

If you're going to think you might as well think big — real big.

The watch is available in a signed and numbered limited edition in red gold with a red gold dial (pictured).

2jyjy

Price upon application: info@ikepod.com

October 26, 2007 at 03:01 PM | Permalink


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Comments

"the 'event horizon' in astrophysics, literally meaning the edge of a black hole — the moment when gravity becomes infinite, when both time and space disappear."

That's what us professionals refer to as bollocks.

Nothing within a black hole's event horizon can ever come out (deem Hawking-related caveats to have been included here), but that doesn't mean that the moment you dip through that radius of no return, you shoot off into some unknowable trippy-part-of-2001 antiphysical fairyland. You're just now too close to a very massive body for there to be any physical way for you to get away from it again.

The Schwarzschild radius for supermassive black holes, like the ones that're solidly theorised to exist in the middle of most galaxies, is quite large - 7.8 million kilometres, for the hole we think exists at the centre of the Milky Way. You could insert yourself into orbit six million kilometres out from the middle of the hole and sit there perfectly happily for the rest of your life - it's just that nobody outside the event horizon would be able to see you doing it.

Supermassive holes don't even have enough of a gravity gradient to do weird tidal things to you.

Posted by: Daniel Rutter | Oct 28, 2007 9:13:12 AM

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