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March 22, 2008

Lost in transition

Hhhfd

Handovers have their pluses and minuses.

You lose something, someone finds it, they let you know.

Should they leave it for you somewhere with someone or try to give it directly to you?

Might be a lot easier to leave it with a third party, but I don't recommend that course of action even if it inconveniences you a lot.

As soon as a third party gets involved, the chance of you not getting your lost item back in the same shape it was found in diminishes a lot.

I've seen this happen twice in recent weeks to people's cellphones.

One time the individual ranted and fumed about how stupid the finder was, to have taken it home with her and made the owner trek across town to get it when it could have been left at the coffee shop where it was found or in the student activities office at school.

Excuse me, but since I'm the person who asked the finder to hold on to it and give it directly to the owner rather than drop it off, I'm entitled to my opinion.

Which is that I handled it correctly and would do exactly the same thing the next time.

Sure, it's great to take the easy way but if it's not as secure it's not easy — it's dumb.

In the OR, handing off a case to another anesthesiologist can have its pluses and minuses.

On the good side, oftimes the fresh person notices something the incumbent hadn't and corrects it, to the benefit of the anesthetized patient.

On the bad side, sometimes the relieving doctor discovers something amiss and doesn't know if it's serious or not, something new or instead something that's been going on for hours and was passed over in the handover report.

Too often this discovery occurs after the original anesthesiologist is dressed and out of the hospital, say 10–15 minutes after being relieved.

Then you're not sure what to do.

That's why I make it a practice to always — always — stick around in my scrubs for 15 minutes or so after being relieved, then go back into the room to check that the relief anesthesiologist is OK with the case or if there are any loose ends.

Much better that way.

I only wish they came back to the room after I've taken over but hey, you can't have everything.

March 22, 2008 at 12:01 PM | Permalink


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Comments

"That's why I always — always — make it practice to stick around in my scrubs for 15 minutes or so after being relieved, then go back into the room to check that the relief anesthesiologist is OK with the case or if there are any loose ends."

-Words of Wisdom from a wise man.
I wish more of my colleagues acted this way.

Posted by: QuietusLeo | Mar 22, 2008 10:44:47 PM

Having gone through general anesthesia several times in my life, all I can say is that were I your patient, I would appreciate this courtesy. It should be the norm, not a random kind of occurrence this handover procedure you yourself engage in.

Posted by: Milena | Mar 22, 2008 1:18:01 PM

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