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July 23, 2008

Why a Leopard is like a person: Notes on code

4439leopardappledarkmed

Reading the back and forth lately on my local Mac users forum about bugs and getting it right and updates and all, I got to thinking about similarities between computer code and human code in the form of DNA.

How many millions of years have gone by since the chimpanzee and genus homo separated genetically, with the time since spent in an endless Bayesian refining and recalculating by natural selection to get to where we are today?

I'd hazard a guess that time period is far longer than it's been since the core code of what became today's dominant computer operating systems was written.

So the fact that bugs and crashes occur shouldn't be a surprise; I mean, does anyone say that because people get sick and even die, the human OS is a failure and we should commit mass suicide?

I think not.

We try to do the best we can with what we have and improve in the future.

So with Leopard and its ilk: not perfect, but ever closer.

Be glad.

Be very glad.

July 23, 2008 at 04:01 PM | Permalink | Comments (2) | TrackBack

What is it?

Gfgd

Answer here this time tomorrow.

July 23, 2008 at 03:01 PM | Permalink | Comments (5) | TrackBack

The best restroom in America

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This year's contest is on and the balloting is fast and furious.

Polls close July 31 at the stroke of midnight.

Vote early and often, as they say in Chicago — right here.

Last year's winner was Jungle Jim's in Fairfield, Ohio.

You could look it up.

July 23, 2008 at 02:01 PM | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Cordless Mobile Electronics Charger

Tyiy97yh

Ooh, that got my attention.

From websites:

    Cordless Mobile Electronics Charger

    This mobile power hub is smaller than a deck of cards yet recharges and provides instant auxiliary power to an iPod, BlackBerry, digital camera or cell phone, eliminating the need to carry multiple chargers and power cords or locate an AC outlet when traveling.

    The charger has a USB port and a pivoting USB arm that plugs directly into a device, ensuring compatibility with most electronics including the PlayStation Portable, Game Boy Micro, Motorola phones like the Razr, SLVR and Rokr, and more.

    Multiple devices can be powered simultaneously.

    The unit can recharge an iPod nano seven times or a BlackBerry three times on a single charge.

    Built-in protection against power and temperature surges and high-input voltages.

    The unit's built-in lithium-ion battery recharges in three hours via the included AC or DC adapters or in six hours using the included USB adapter.

    1"H x 2-2/3"W x 3-1/4"L.

    5 oz.

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Youyoyuoyu

"Multiple devices can be powered simultaneously."

Read "two" if you use both the "... USB port and a pivoting USB arm that plugs directly into a device."

I guess that's "multiple."

Meaning more than one.

I always think of more than two when I think "multiple" but maybe that's just me.

Because the American Heritage Dictionary defines "multiple" as "Having, relating to, or consisting of more than one individual, element, part, or other component."

You could look it up.

But I digress.

The charger costs $29.99.

Not bad considering all the accessories (above).

In fact, a pretty good deal.

July 23, 2008 at 01:01 PM | Permalink | Comments (2) | TrackBack

Poetry and Religion — by Les Murray

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Religions are poems. They concert
our daylight and dreaming mind, our
emotions, instinct, breath and native gesture

into the only whole thinking: poetry.
Nothing's said till it's dreamed out in words
and nothing's true that figures in words only.

A poem, compared with an arrayed religion,
may be like a soldier's one short marriage night
to die and live by. But that is a small religion...

There'll always be religion around while there is poetry

or a lack of it. Both are given, and intermittent,
as the action of those birds—crested pigeon, rosella parrot—
who fly with wings shut, then beating, and again shut.
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July 23, 2008 at 12:01 PM | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Lumen

1nest

Designed by

2flock_1

Adam Frank.

3mag1

"Lumen is a series of acid-etched stainless steel oil lamp shadow projectors."

4mag2

Nest (top), Flock (second from top), Pine (final three images), Magnolia or Cedar.

5mag3

$48.

July 23, 2008 at 11:01 AM | Permalink | Comments (2) | TrackBack

Shopping Cart Wash: Be afraid. Be very afraid.

1fjyyt

Currently up and running at the Chevy Chase Supermarket "... is the Washington [D.C.] area's first full-scale shopping cart wash (above), a push-through device that sprays a misty peroxide solution over each cart between every use. It dries in a few seconds, leaving behind a faint whiff of beauty parlor and a cart promised to be 99.9 percent germ free for the next customer," wrote Steve Hendrix in today's Washington Post Style section front page story, which follows.

    Shopping Cart Wash Lets Customers Get Groceries, Not Germs

    The Kirsch brothers want you to know: At Chevy Chase Supermarket, it is now safe to lick the shopping carts.

    Not that they recommend it, mind you, but as co-owners, along with their dad, of the venerable independent grocery store on Connecticut Avenue, Jason and Kevin Kirsch know how common it is for their youngest customers to treat cart handles like lollipops. Worse, they know how unnerved folks have become in recent years over alarmist reports that rank shopping carts right up there with public restroom toilet seats in terms of germs.

    And so the brothers yesterday installed what they say is the Washington area's first full-scale shopping cart wash, a push-through device that sprays a misty peroxide solution over each cart between every use. It dries in a few seconds, leaving behind a faint whiff of beauty parlor and a cart promised to be 99.9 percent germ free for the next customer.

    "It kills all the nasty stuff, salmonella, staph, E. coli," said Bob Schwei, a technician with PureCart Systems, the Wisconsin-based manufacturer of the glossy white machine, which looks like an airport X-ray machine. "They're very popular in Korea — bird flu."

    As Schwei finished installing the unit next to the row of checkout aisles, customers stopped to see the first sanitized carts roll through. Suzi Walsh, a self-described germ-phobe and a regular shopper from Kensington, said she had been waiting for the new system since the store announced it was coming several weeks ago.

    "I'm the kind of person who uses a bit of paper towel to open the bathroom door," said Walsh, who said she prefers shopping in the winter when she can leave her gloves on. "This is great. I see the kids scratch their diapers, then grab the cart. No, no, no. I'm way beyond that."

    But Jason Kirsch said parents with young children are likely to be the most excited by the prospect of a clean cart. He made sure that his collection of kiddy carts, the ones with big plastic police cars and firetrucks bolted to the front [below],

    2futr

    would fit through the machine. "Hey, I'm the father of three," he said. "I know the first thing they want to do is chew, touch, feel."

    A few aisles over in the pasta section, Marti Robey of Kensington, a mother of five, said she knows all about the powerful magnetic draw that shopping cart handles can have on toddler tongues.

    "You turn back with something from the shelf, and they've got their mouth wrapped around it," Robey said.

    Still, she said shopping cart bacteria wasn't high on her list of Things to Worry About. The two she had riding in the red pickup truck kiddy cart yesterday, Betsy, 6, and Jake, 3, would have no trouble finding other ways to get germy in the normal course of a kid's day.

    "After rolling in dirt and mud and stuff, I don't worry about the shopping cart so much," she said.

    Like all grocers, the Kirsches have seen concerns over cart cleanliness grow over the years. They used to pressure wash the carts on a monthly basis and more recently added sanitary wipe dispensers near them so customers could scrub their own handles, and more.

    "We'd see people out in the parking lot trying to wipe down the whole cart," said Walter Kirsch, who has worked at the store since 1963 and owned it, with his sons, since 1985. "We're a small family business. This is just another way that we're taking care of the neighborhood."

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Look for Whole Foods to be all over this in a granola minute.

July 23, 2008 at 10:01 AM | Permalink | Comments (9) | TrackBack

John Deere Rug

87o7o87y9

From the website:

    John Deere Rug

    Designed in Norway and manufactured in Sweden of wool from New Zealand and inspired by a common image of rural America, the John Deere tractor.

    Dimension: 63" Ø.

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2iuhkuy

Grass (pictured) or Mud.

$1,689.

July 23, 2008 at 09:01 AM | Permalink | Comments (2) | TrackBack

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