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September 21, 2008

Turophilia and its (dis)contents

Jijij

Until two days ago I had no idea what the word meant.

That was before I happened on it in the course of reading the current (September) issue of Wine Spectator (top).

I made a note to get a copy of the magazine when I happened on a full page newspaper ad featuring the cheese-centered issue but ran into a roadblock when, inquiring at my local Barnes & Noble after I couldn't find the magazine among the many devoted to food and wine, I was told they don't carry it.

Nor did I have any luck at Harris Teeter, Whole Foods, Kroger or CVS.

Enough, said I to my crack research team: find it online.

It took 'em a while but lo and behold if the key to access wasn't at Mygazines.com, which I featured back on August 21, 2008.

Long story short: You register (free) and instantly gain access to the magazine selection.

There was the elusive issue of Wine Spectator, large as life, so I printed out the articles about cheese and took the results to the store today to pick up what looked interesting.

September 21, 2008 at 05:01 PM | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack

Rocket ride on the cheap

Hbhuhuh

Why pay more?

From the website:

    Classic Storefront Rocket Ride

    This is the classic rocket ride encountered in front of supermarkets during the 1960s, recalling a time when a single nickel and imagination was the only requirement a child needed.

    An authentic unit has been refurbished to its original state, including the details of its tapered nose cone, bulbous body and symbols suggestive of space travel.

    Made of sturdy fiberglass, the rocket ride uses an electric motor to provide the same one-minute "traveling" motion that it provided nearly half a century ago, including gentle rising, diving and banking left and right; the speed of motion is controlled by turning the handlebars.

    A built-in sound system produces rocket sound effects including take-off procedures, countdown, lift-off and flight.

    Resting on a platform of polished aluminum diamond plate — the classic metal flooring for carnival arcade rides — the ride rolls smoothly on four casters.

    The coin box takes dimes; coins are easily retrieved.

    6-1/2 feet high x 5 feet long x 2-1/2 feet wide.

    Plugs into AC.

    200 lbs.

....................

Bang, zoom, straight to the moon, Alice....

$10,000.

September 21, 2008 at 04:01 PM | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

EZ Fill Liquid Level Alarm

Ujiipuj

Think outside the visually-impaired space.

From the website:

    EZ Fill Liquid Indicator

    A small bright red device that buzzes to indicate a liquid has reached about 1 inch from the top of a container.

    Uses three 1.5 volt LR44 batteries (included).

    2.25"H x 1.25"W x 0.75"D.

....................

Dafr3f

$12.95.

September 21, 2008 at 03:01 PM | Permalink | Comments (4) | TrackBack

Marguerite Duras in Saigon

Gyuuoy_2

The picture of her above appeared on the 1985 Pantheon edition of her novel, "The Lover."

According to Mary Cregan, writing in the September 8, 2008 Financial Times, "the photograph dates from the period when, as a schoolgirl in Saigon [in the late 1920s], she had a long affair with a wealthy Chinese man."

The fictionalized story of her romance "... resulted in sales of more than a million copies in 43 languages, as well as a movie; a stunning comeback for an artist in her 70s who less than two years before "The Lover" was published had nearly killed herself with drink."

Duras (below)

Hgyjuyuy

died in 1996 at the age of 81.

September 21, 2008 at 02:01 PM | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Pavillon — by Jérôme Coste

Uoiuoiu

Ultralight motorcycle helmet

Uiuioy

made of carbon fiber, edged in
chrome and lined with nappa lamb.

[via Rebecca Voight and the New York Times]

September 21, 2008 at 01:01 PM | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Anti-Theft Lunch Bag

1rrtyed

A kindred spirit to the wonderful Skid Mark Brief Safe.

2erw

From the website:

    Anti-Theft Lunch Bag

    Stealing your co-worker's lunch is a downright contemptible act, that is, if it's perpetrated by someone other than you.

    But, if you've ever had your lunch stolen, you know the the frustration and anger it causes.

    You know the revenge and ill-will it inspires.

    And you know that no matter how well you try to hide your lunch bag at the back of the refrigerator, something's gonna be missing when you open it.

    Well, lament no more.

    The Anti-Theft Lunch Bag to the rescue....

    Anti-Theft Lunch Bags are regular sandwich bags that have green splotches printed on both sides.

    After your sandwich is placed inside, no one will want to touch it.

    If you're interested in getting your hands dirty with these bags, please send an email to skforlee@gmail.com and I'll let you know when they become available.

......................

[via Milena]

September 21, 2008 at 12:01 PM | Permalink | Comments (2) | TrackBack

'It is about making it to 30, or maybe 50, without wanting to shoot yourself in the head." — Did David Foster Wallace write those 18 words?

Jgyjy

I assumed, after reading them in this past Friday's Wall Street Journal, where they comprised the penultimate sentence of the penultimate paragraph of what the newspaper, in an unattributed introduction, wrote was "Adapted from a commencement speech given by David Foster Wallace [above] to the 2005 graduating class at Kenyon College," that they most certainly were.

And as such, I quoted them in my 4:01 p.m. post yesterday.

But then, last evening at 7:58 p.m., reader Laura Camacho emailed me as follows:

    Joe,

    I loved the article you linked to, but it states that it is "adapted" from his commencement speech. I found what claims to be a transcription of the actual speech here: http://www.marginalia.org/dfw_kenyon_commencement.html. It doesn't mention the shooting oneself in the head (not sure where that came from, but I do think it a bit macabre of someone to ADD IT IN after he's killed himself!!!!!!!).

....................

I went back to the transcription she was referring to and read it twice without finding any evidence of the 18-word sentence in the headline up top, whose source now became troubling to me.

At 9:38 p.m. last night I emailed Bill Stilwell, who hosts the transcription I studied, as follows:

    Dear Mr. Stilwell,

    I noted that the Wall Street Journal devoted an entire page of yesterday's
    paper to what it wrote was "Adapted from a commencement speech given by David Foster Wallace to the 2005 graduating class at Kenyon College. Mr. Wallace, 46, died last Friday, after apparently committing suicide."

    The penultimate sentence of the penultimate paragraph of the piece in the paper read, "It is about making it to 30, or maybe 50, without wanting to shoot yourself in the head."

    A reader of my blog (http://www.bookofjoe.com/2008/09/david-foster-wa.html)
    wrote, "I loved the article you linked to, but it states that it is 'adapted' from his commencement speech. I found what claims to be a transcription of the actual speech here: http://www.marginalia.org/dfw_kenyon_commencement.html."

    "It doesn't mention the shooting oneself in the head (not sure where that came from, but I do think it a bit macabre of someone to ADD IT IN after he's killed himself!!!!!!!)."

    I concur.

    I read the address as it appears on the site you host and likewise found nothing remotely close to the line in the newspaper rendition.

    Any thoughts?

    Best,

    Joe

....................

His reply came in at 2:17 a.m. today, and follows:

    Hi Mr Stirt,

    I can only really lay claim to hosting the transcript — I don't have an original recording. You can see the original posts on the wallace-l mailing list.

    I suspect that the WSJ published something adapted from the actual published version, from "The Best American Nonrequired Reading 2006". I don't have a copy to verify this though.

    It could be that Wallace diverged from his written remarks, or reworked them slightly for publication. I agree that it would be horrible if the line was added by someone, but I think it's unlikely.

    Bill

....................

I just read the May 27, 2005 transcription Mr. Stilwell pointed me to in his email and once again, there is not a trace of those 18 words present.

So I put this question to the Wall Street Journal: Who wrote those words — and where may we find proof that they are in fact Wallace's rather than those of an anonymous staffer seeking to heighten the heart-rending impact of Wallace's suicide nine days ago at the age of 46?

I will be sending a link to this post to the Wall Street Journal as well as placing it in the comments section below its version of Wallace's address.

I hope to receive an answer shortly, which I will publish immediately.

Silence on the part of the Wall Street Journal will echo loudly.

In virtual space it sounds like a scream.

September 21, 2008 at 10:01 AM | Permalink | Comments (4) | TrackBack

Made in the Philippines — by Willie Cole

Williecolemadeinthephilippineschai

Below,

Whitespace_20h_x_60wUu66

the artist kicks back.


September 21, 2008 at 09:01 AM | Permalink | Comments (3) | TrackBack

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