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March 3, 2010

Finally, the dawning of the Age of Aquarius

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Nonpareil New York Times columnist Charles M. Blow's Op-Ed piece in the December 12, 2009 issue was, as always, accompanied by eye-opening graphics (above and below).

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Wrote Blow, "For the first time in 47 years of polling, the number of Americans who said that they have had a religious or mystical experience, which the question defined as a 'moment of sudden religious insight or awakening,' was greater than those who said that they had not."

March 3, 2010 at 04:01 PM | Permalink | Comments (5) | TrackBack

Yuanyang II — by Tsang Cheung-Shing

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[via Curved White and mappeal]

March 3, 2010 at 03:01 PM | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Diet Scale

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"Instead of showing weight, this scale tells a person what to eat, according to their weight."

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Designed by Ji Lee.

March 3, 2010 at 02:01 PM | Permalink | Comments (2) | TrackBack

What is it?

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Answer here this time tomorrow.

March 3, 2010 at 01:01 PM | Permalink | Comments (3) | TrackBack

Helpful hints from joeeze: 'What happens to my e-mail accounts when I die?'

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Courtesy of Jeffrey Goldberg's "What's Your Problem?" feature on the final page of the January/February 2010 Atlantic Magazine.

Q. What happens to my e-mail accounts when I die?

A. If you suspect that you’re going to die soon, I suggest that you print out important correspondence, or share your password with a loved one. If you have a Yahoo e-mail account, no one will be allowed access to it, so your contacts will have to be notified of your death some other way; the company will permanently delete your e-mails when it receives a death certificate. Gmail is a bit more generous. Your legal representative will be allowed access to your account when proof of death is provided. AOL also transfers the e-mail account to your designated representative upon receipt of a death certificate. The new user will have the option of sending out a death notice, or simply deleting the account. Individual companies have different policies, of course. When we die here at The Atlantic, our e-mails and other forms of electronic communication are collated, bound, and offered for sale to the general public. I highly recommend such works as The Collected Facebook Postings of Henry James (in nine volumes—he updated his page constantly); Harriet Beecher Stowe Tweets the Great Contest Which Still Absorbs the Attention and Engrosses the Energies of the Nation; and, of course, Thoreau’s BlackBerry. 

March 3, 2010 at 12:01 PM | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

What is it?

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Answer here this time tomorrow.

March 3, 2010 at 11:01 AM | Permalink | Comments (2) | TrackBack

Fromage Girls Calendar

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"Hoping to increase sales and 'smash the stereotype of the frumpy French farm wife,'

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the Association of Traditional French Cheese Makers (l'Association Fromage de Terroirs) ...

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unveils the 2010 Limited-Edition Fromage Girls pin-up calendar."

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The Fromages-de-Terroirs website advertises the calendar as featuring

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"12 jeunes femmes s'amusent du fromage en le mettant des situations inattendues"

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(12 young women playing around with cheese in unusual situations).

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€15.

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yo, Joe Peach — is this what you had in mind?

[via French for a While and The Economist]

March 3, 2010 at 10:01 AM | Permalink | Comments (3) | TrackBack

World's best fingernail clipper

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The moment you handle it you'll notice the difference.

Functional art.

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Amortize the cost over a year and it's only 33 cents a week.

Well worth the repeated pleasure of using it.

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Stainless steel.

Made in Japan.

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$17.

March 3, 2010 at 09:01 AM | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack

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