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November 26, 2010

Book Deodorizer

 Deo_100

 From the website:

.............................

The perfect solution to a smelly problem.

These treated granules absorb moisture and odors.

Used to treat books, papers, clothing or other inanimate objects, they will remove cigarette smoke, mildew odors, and general mustiness.

The granules are an inert and highly absorbent material which look like brown couscous and have an organic base.

All natural. Non-toxic. Made in the USA.

  • Put a layer of granules in an airtight plastic container and seal the book up for at least 2 weeks.
  • The length of time depends on the harshness of the odor.
  • The granules last for about 6 months or more, depending on how much you use them.
  • When they are spent, you can add them to your compost pile, they are biodegradable.

.............................

Coolerdeo

The site quotes four favorable reviews of the stuff, in each case linked to a book dealer's website.

One pound: $16.

[via Cary Sternick]

November 26, 2010 at 03:01 PM | Permalink


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Comments

A standard activated charcoal deodorizer, usually found for less than five dollars, works just as well when placed with the books in a sealed container.

Posted by: jdb | Nov 29, 2010 7:23:46 PM

Is this similar to or copied from Joyce's famous formula?

Posted by: adorno | Nov 27, 2010 2:17:41 AM

Have you ever borrowed a library book that stank so much you returned it the same day? I have. This should be purchased by all of the libraries and put into use when a book is returned with extreme odors.

Posted by: Susie | Nov 26, 2010 11:44:20 PM

NA, Na, na, NO! N-O as in "No." NO!

Posted by: Kay | Nov 26, 2010 10:48:58 PM

A BOOK deodorizer? I believe I've never met a book that needed to be deodorized. If said book should have an "odor", is that not part of the charm of an ancient missive?

Is this another piece of nonsensical-Americana, similar to the roto-rooter that delivers food to the mouth?

EVERYthing does not need to be Saran-wrapped and sanitized. Get a grip. Not you, Joe, I mean the motoring public who would be led to believe they should spend their cash and their time deodorizing their books.

Posted by: Kay | Nov 26, 2010 10:47:04 PM

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