« "The Jameson Satellite" — Founding document of the cryonics movement | Home | The long, strange path of St. Cuthbert's Gospel »

July 27, 2011

Pin-Probe Mechanical Stud Finder

25T2301

Sean Michael Ragan reviewed this tool in the latest issue (volume 27) of Make magazine as follows.

Garrett Wade's Japanese-made Stud Finder is entirely mechanical, requiring no batteries. It combines a classic magnetic "click" sensor with a spring-loaded pin, shielded by a graduated depth gauge that physically probes the space behind the wall and confirms or denies the presence of a stud pretty much unequivocally. Unlike a capacitative stud finder, it will never have problems working through plaster, foil insulation, or wire lath.

The probe does leave a small hole in the drywall, but it's tiny — a spot of paint will fill it without any spackle at all. Plus, as a bonus features that't (I think) unique to to this type of stud finder, the depth gauge provides an accurate measurement of the thickness of the drywall. This can be a crucial bit of information when choosing fasteners, whether they're screws going into the studs or anchors going into the drywall.

The tool unscrews in the middle, which allows for removal of the pin and/or access to a store of replacement pins in the handle (the device ships with 2 pins and a pack of 10 costs $8.80). The pin plunger has a rotary safety lock to keep the sharp end safely covered when not in use. The're also a lanyard hole in the pommel in case you want to hang it up.

$16.75.

Remember yesterday's advice re: wearing a tool around your neck to the airport?

Don't.

July 27, 2011 at 09:01 AM | Permalink


TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
https://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d8341c5dea53ef0153902ba5dc970b

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Pin-Probe Mechanical Stud Finder:

Comments

So that was where all the clacking noise came from! I'm just used to lights and arrows and LEDs going off as I walk down that part of the tool isle. I was looking for some Japanese saws and it sounded like a rack of .22's dry-firing.

Posted by: 6.02*10^23 | Jul 27, 2011 10:16:10 AM

The comments to this entry are closed.