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August 22, 2021

'Moby-Dick'

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I did it! 

After many false starts over six decades, I just finished this magnificent book, which turned out to be every bit as good as people have said since it was rediscovered long after its 1851 publication and placed in the pantheon.

Oddly enough, this time around it didn't seem at all difficult, whereas on previous attempts I had to stop because it seemed impenetrable.

Maybe my brain's being reborn by reading Flautist's comments.

But I digress.

I was gonna post a selection of quotations from the novel but there got to be too many and I didn't feel like going to the trouble (remember, my default setting is lazy).

While reading the book over the past month or so, I happened on two films about whales that came out this year, each of which I enjoyed, but I don't recommend them because I think more likely than not you'll find them boring.

They are "The Loneliest Whale"

and "Fathom."

Not up to undertaking Herman Melville's magnum opus?

No problema.

For you, there's this 2011 movie 

starring Ethan Hawke, Donald Sutherland, and William Hurt, with a running time of over three hours.

At least for now you can watch it free, the way we like it.

Fair warning....

August 22, 2021 at 04:01 PM | Permalink


Comments

Based on an actual whale.

https://www.google.com/search?q=whale+moby+dick&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&hl=en-us&client=safari

I recommend “In the Heart of the Sea.” (I think that’s the one I read in audio format.)

Posted by: Paul Tempke | Aug 25, 2021 4:14:00 PM

Joe, Thank you for bringing The Loneliest Whale to my attention. The teaser served its purpose. I want to see the film.

I missed the Moby Dick miniseries, but I ginned up the show in YouTube thanks to you.

Posted by: antares | Aug 24, 2021 1:52:37 AM

You are a man of medicine, science, facts and logic.
Reading Moby Dick you must set those aside as the whole business of whaling was so incredible it sounds like one of Grimm Brothers tales. But Melville actually did some whaling near the end of its era and what he writes is pretty true. Once you accept that, the overlaid fictional human drama is easier to follow without the distraction.

Posted by: xoxoxoBruce | Aug 23, 2021 4:06:18 PM

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