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January 24, 2022

East Side Access Project: What lies beneath

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Sixteen stories below midtown Manhattan, a remarkable construction project that started in 2006 is slated to be finished and open to hoi polloi this coming December.

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The main concourse (top and above), five football fields (about 1/3 mile) long, eight stories high, and 70 feet wide, will have four train tunnels. 

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Note the size of the construction workers building it.

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Blasting and grinding through bedrock continues 24 hours a day while the people of Gotham go about their business unawares.

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Originally estimated to cost $2 billion, the project's cost has ballooned to $12 billion, making it one of the world's most expensive public works.

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Read more here and here.

January 24, 2022 at 04:01 PM | Permalink | Comments (1)

BehindTheMedspeak: Your guess is as good as mine

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He's right here in my Podunk town and ready to see you.

Perfect name for a doctor.

One of the dirty little secrets of being one is that seldom are we certain, but the art of practicing medicine is to never let patients know just how much hunch and guesswork goes into what we do.

January 24, 2022 at 02:01 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)

15,000-year-old sculpture of a horse

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Known as the Lourdes Horse, it was discovered between 1886 and 1889 by the scholar Léon Nelli in the Grotte [cave] des Espélugues in Lourdes, Hautes-Pyrénées, France.

It is three inches long.

The carving was done in exceptionally fine detail, and it was long assumed that, like other carvings from this time, it was made from mammoth ivory.

In November 2013, Jean-Marc Pétillon, a researcher at the  University of Toulouse-Le Mirail in France, wrote in the Journal of Human Evolution that the horse was actually carved from whale bone.

The presumption is that the bone came from a carcass found on the coast or from barter with coastal people.

Though Léon Nelli intended to publish his discovery of the horse and other art objects found in the Grottes des Espéluges, he left an unpublished treatise on these objects when he died in 1934.  

His son, René Nelli, first published his father's manuscript as Chef-d'Oeuvre de la Grotte des Espélugues (Lourdes Htes-Pyr.). Fouilles de Léon Nelli, 1889. 

This was issued in Toulouse by the Institut d'Etudes Occitanes in 1948 in an edition limited to 100 copies.

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[via History of Information]

January 24, 2022 at 12:01 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)

COMMENTS SECTION ➜

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Just as once upon a time salt shakers were a thing here, comments seem to have established themselves as a recurring theme.

Some constant readers may recall posts earlier this month, on January 12 and 19.

Others, whose memories are more evanescent, will have a different experience.

No matter: boj is a big tent, all are welcome.

January 24, 2022 at 10:01 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)

Phone Spinner

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Shopping

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Black or White: $13.

January 24, 2022 at 08:01 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)

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